02
July
2016

April, May, June

Honestly, April and May were rough. There is a reason I’m not posting this until July. The short version is: I was in a lot of physical pain due to ongoing back issues, there were scary medical things affecting people I love, while various other less-serious-but-stressful things were also all happening at once. Happily, much of that is now all better or tending-to-better.

So here I am now, trying to catch up!

GAMING
When I was deep in the throes of pain and stress, there was pretty much one thing I could do that distracted me. It was hard to read, hard to write, hard to watch television. But I could play video games. Specifically, I played Dragon Age Inquisition. Twice.

I am a huge fan of the Mass Effect trilogy, also by BioWare, and enjoyed the first Dragon Age game a lot (in fact, I think the Alistair romance in that game is my current all-time favorite video-game romance). But I didn’t love Dragon Age 2, so I’d been a little leery of Inquisition, the third in the series. I’d heard it was a bigger, more sprawling game with a lot of side-quests and I was afraid my completionist nature would drive me up the wall. And I did have to fight the urge to do everything. But I had SO MUCH FUN. I loved all the different new regions of the world: running through an endless moonlit desert, tramping through a sorrowful, beautiful enchanted forest, chasing after cute big-eared foxes on my way to adventure. And I loved the characters and the story, the funny moments that made me laugh out loud and the stirring, passionate moments of bravery and loss.

I’m just so grateful I found this game when I needed it. (And I really REALLY hope there is going to be a Dragon Age 4 now.)

Here’s my canonical elven mage Inquisitor (who romanced Solas, for those who understand what that means…)

Screenshot from Dragon Age Inquisition of a white-haired, brown-skinned elven woman.

READING
Archie, Vol. 1: The New Riverdale by Mark Waid, Fiona Staples, Annie Wu, Veronica Fish [YA Comic]
Archie was the first comic I read as a kid, and I can still remember several of the stories vividly. So I was excited to hear that a new version was being produced, with some updated backstories and new spins on several of the main characters. In general I really loved this (especially the art by Fiona Staples in the first few issues). I loved how Archie and Betty had a complicated backstory, and how Jughead’s character finally made sense to me. I’m not sure I love it so much I’m going to keep reading, but this was a fun and nostalgic read.

The Traitor in the Tunnel by Y.S. Lee [YA Historical Mystery]
I’ve been working my way through this ongoing YA historical mystery series with great enjoyment. My favorite part is Mary Quinn herself, the Victorian-era teenage spy who goes undercover as a maid, who struggles with her own complicated origins and history, who is so capable and clear-sighted.

The Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks [Adult Graphic Novel]
I’d heard a podcast about the Harlem Hellfighters on Stuff You Missed in History Class that intrigued me, so I ended up taking this somewhat fictionalized graphic novel out of the library to learn more about these Black soldiers fighting overseas during WWI, fighting fiercely, earning medals and acclaim, in spite of racism and discrimination. Sobering, informative, inspiring, and infuriating.

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng [Adult Mystery]
The premise of this hooked me: the slow unraveling of the mystery behind a teen girl’s death, seen through the eyes of her family. I am not entirely satisfied by the ending, but I think perhaps I’m not supposed to be…

The Secret Place by Tana French [Adult Mystery]
I’ve loved the other two Tana French novels I’ve read (The Likeness and Faithful Place) and this one was in some ways my favorite of all. The writing is absolutely brilliant and gorgeous, and the structure unfolds in a tremendously compelling way: alternating chapters in the present, from the point of view of the detective investigating the murder of a young man on the grounds of a fancy girl’s boarding school, and chapters in the past, from the points of view of four girls at the school, leading up to the murder itself.

Night Witches: The Amazing Story of Russia’s Women Pilots in WWII by Bruce Myles [Adult Non Fiction]
This was another read inspired by Stuff You Missed in History Class, and I’m so glad I sought it out. A fascinating, if dense and occasionally hard-to-follow account of the Soviet women who served as fighter pilots and bombers during WW2. I found the topic so fascinating I’ve already started reading another book about these women. Some of my favorite parts were the small details about the lives of these women, like how they would dye the white silk caps they wore under their helmet pretty colors, or how they pooled their rations to bake cakes for one girl’s birthday (or, in another case, carved a watermelon when there were no supplies for cake). This was one of those books that really made history come vividly alive for me.

Year of Yes: How to Dance It Out, Stand In the Sun and Be Your Own Person
by Shonda Rhimes [Adult Non Fiction/Memoir]
Inspiring and thought-provoking. Also, it made me start watching Grey’s Anatomy!

WRITING
I’m revising my most recent project again. It’s hard, but I feel like I’m making it better. Onward!

RAMBLES
Once the glorious Maine weather started to feel more summery, I got out on some escapades:

To the Coastal Botanical Garden to see the rhododendrons:
Photo of Deva standing by a pink rhododendron

To Rockport Harbor, where I took lots of photos of boats with funny names (there was another small red boat I called The Red Herring!):
Photo of a boat called For Pete's Sake moored in a sunny harbor

And to Camden Harbor, to sit in the beautiful waterside park:
Photo of a harbor on a sunny day, taken by Deva as she's laying in the grassy park along the shore, with her feet in the foreground

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