03
August
2016

July Diversions

Here’s what I was up to in July…

READING

The White Cat and the Monk by Jo Ellen Bogart, Sydney Smith [Picture Book]
A lovely picture book inspired by one of my favorite bits of actual history: the Irish monk who wrote a poem about his cat, comparing the cat’s hunting to his own scholarly work.

Crown of Midnight by Sarah J. Maas [YA Fantasy]
More adventure, more magic, more romance. I started reading this series because they’re so tremendously popular and I wanted to study what they were doing right, but the deeper I get the more I’m just enjoying the story. On the other hand, one particular plot point in this book left me very unhappy and uncomfortable in terms of the treatment of characters of color, even though it made sense storywise. I’m going to keep reading because I love a lot of the other elements of the series, but I want to make that comment here as a caveat to other readers.

Exit, Pursued by a Bear by E. K. Johnston [YA Contemporary]
An incredibly compelling (I could not stop reading) and ultimately uplifting book about a very painful topic. But I don’t want to label this as an “issues” book because it’s so much more than that. It made me care about cheerleading, It made me love these characters, and root for them living their lives, not just surviving a harrowing experience. I loved how it so thoughtfully and deftly explored aspects of personal choice, friendship, gender roles and expectations, and dealing with trauma.

Ms. Marvel, Vol. 5: Super Famous by G. Willow Wilson, Takeshi Miyazawa, Adrian Alphona, Nico Leon [YA Graphic Novel]
This series continues to be so delightful and rich and wonderful. I especially love how Kamala is having to balance all the different parts of her life; so often we see a character struggling with a bunch of responsibilities that they *don’t* want, and ultimately the message is about not wasting time on things that aren’t important to you. It was refreshing to see Kamala confronting the fact that she actually loves all her responsibilities and *wants* to say yes to everything, especially since that’s more true to my own experience (both as a teen, and an adult). And bonus points for the wonderful way the series is handling Kamala’s relationship with her long-time best friend who she loves but just can’t be in a relationship with due to her superheroing. I love that we see him in a new relationship with an awesome, smart new girlfriend who isn’t portrayed as the villain just because she’s a sort of “rival”, and see Kamala navigating that challenge and making mistakes and learning from them.

Jem and the Holograms, Volume 2: Viral by Kelly Thompson, Emma Vieceli, Corin Howell, Amy Mebberson, Maria Victoria Robado [YA Graphic Novel]
Delightful, rich and wonderful are good words for this volume too. My favorite bits are the Stormer-Kimber romance and the effervescent joy of the colorful art and seeing all these cool different female characters interacting with each other.

Monstress, Vol. 1: Awakening by Marjorie Liu, Sana Takeda [Adult Graphic Novel]
I actually read this as individual issues but the collected Volume One is now available so I’m listing it here since it is an amazing work of art. A complex and multi-layered world and characters, swinging from pure beauty to harsh, gruesome horror. Unlike anything else I’m reading.

Saga, Volume 6 by Brian K. Vaughan, Fiona Staples [Adult Graphic Novel]
Still wonderful! Everything else I can say is a spoiler!

Seveneves by Neal Stephenson [Adult Science Fiction]
I am a sucker for disaster movies, and this book is basically one big long disaster movie (or at least, the first two thirds are– the last third takes place 5000 years after the event) with a lot of bonus scientific digressions on orbital mechanics and space-station architecture. Which made is an excellent book for my tastes, though I suspect some readers may want to skim a bunch. It’s also a tremendously thought-provoking book, and also one of the most harrowing books I’ve read recently. I rarely get nightmares from books but the overwhelming dread of the basic premise here really struck me hard: all life, all human civilization on the surface of the earth is going to be wiped out in the aftermath of the breakup of the moon. Humanity will survive in the form of a few thousand people sent into space who must then persist for 5000 years, at which point they’ll need to reseed the Earth with life and recolonize it. This was a book that left me thinking, left me wanting to talk to other readers about the choices the characters made, the shape of the societies that endured, and so much else.

WATCHING

Stranger Things
This Netflix original series was even better than the talk online led me to expect: amazing story, perfect pacing, excellent acting, detailed, pitch-perfect 80s-era costumes/sets/music. We watched all eight episodes in three days, and I still wish there were more RIGHT NOW. I am so glad to hear there is a second season coming!

Editing to add: There was one element of the show that did bother me, which was the treatment of one particular female character, Barb (one of my favorites, possibly because she reminded me of myself) . I just had a friend share the link to this article that really pinpointed why Barb’s story was problematic, and also explored some other critical commentary I found really interesting. Again, I did love the show and recommend it, but I would love it even more if it addresses the issues laid out in that article in Season 2!

Ghostbusters
I loved the new Ghostbusters! It had all the joy and humor and excitement I remember from the original, and I adore the new cast.

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