Posts Tagged ‘crafting’

March Diversions

03
April
2016

What I was up to last month. Aspirational fabrics, fabulous books, food obsessions…

READING
Goodbye Stranger by Rebecca Stead [MG Contemporary]
I enjoyed this even more than Stead’s Newbery-winning When You Reach Me. I loved the characters, how believable and messy and wonderful their relationships were, and how perfectly Stead captured the middle-school balance between being a kid and being a teen. So many small perfect details all came into play, and there is a very cool use of second-person POV in a set of chapters interspersed with the main plotline (that of course end up weaving into the main story by the end). Also, this book introduced me to the dizzying world of YouTube hair tutorials…

How I found it: I’d heard about it in passing, but what really made me go and look for it was the SLJ Battle of the Kid’s Books.

This Side of Home by Renée Watson [YA Contemporary]
I was in the mood for a contemporary novel about friendship and home and life and choices, and this fit that perfectly, with bonus exploration of gentrification and racism. I requested it from the library along with a whole bunch of other titles I was interested in, and the voice just caught me and didn’t let me go.

How I found it: I don’t recall where I first saw this referenced, but it’s popped up in enough lists of recommended books, diverse reading lists, and friends’ recommendations that I had it on my radar.

All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely [YA Contemporary]
A powerful exploration of modern race relations in the US, told in duel POV (a black boy who is beaten by a cop, and a white boy who witnesses the beating, who both attend the same school and have friends in common). Both voices were so powerful. I really appreciated how this book took a topic we see far too often in the headlines and really dug in and explored it on a personal level.

How I found it: Another one that is all around the blogosphere. And with good reason! It was actually a thought-provoking post by author Zetta Elliott that praised much of the book but was critical of one aspect (the lack of black female voices) that really pushed me to go get a copy.

Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard [YA Speculative]
I don’t know if I could give a thoughtful critique of this book: it basically just compelled me to read it as fast as possible (which, given that I was listening to an audio book, was a challenge! It was a good thing I started it when I was on vacation and spending a lot of time in the car!). I’m not even sure I really liked the characters. I just HAD TO KNOW what was going to happen next!
How I found it: It’s a NYT bestseller, optioned for film, talked-about everywhere.

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo [YA Fantasy]
I loved this, and was deeply impressed by it, especially as a writer. Five different points of view that all felt distinct and necessary, amazing characterization full of shades of gray and mysteries and secrets, incredibly rich worldbuilding, AND a complicated, engaging plot. But really, my favorite part (the reason I am desperate for book 2) was Kaz and Inej. Individually, but especially together.
How I found it: I read and loved Bardugo’s first trilogy, set in the same world as this new duology. And I loved the idea of a magical heist novel!

Just So Happens by Fumio Obata [Adult Contemporary Graphic Novel]
Beautiful artwork that swept me into a subtle, bittersweet meditation on choice and grief (which makes this sound like a depressing book, but it’s not).
How I found it: I saw an image of the cover in a blog post somewhere, and the subtle, beautiful quality of the art made me go look it up!

WRITING
Still on hiatus from actual hands-to-keyboard writing, but doing a lot of mulling of possible projects, until last week when I started reading an awesome nonfiction history book and thought: “I really wish someone would write a novel about this!”

followed by: “Maybe I could?”

followed by: “But it wouldn’t work because of all the pesky FACTS and also I can’t afford a research trip and I wouldn’t do justice to it.”

and then finally: “But what if I made it a fantasy. Then I could add [REDACTED]! [REDACTED] make everything better!”

And now my brain is spinning merrily on that new idea.

(Bonus points for anyone who can guess what [REDACTED] is…)

CRAFTING
I started my first felting project. Charlie is dubious:

[Photo of my hand holding a blue-green felted blob as it is sniffed by a cute black-and-white dog]

I’ve also been preparing for some future crafting. My dad donated all of this beautiful fabric, which I am going to use to make some costuming for a new Live Action Role-Playing game I’m working on.

[Photo of an array of brightly colored printed fabrics, mostly in shades of red, yellow, green, cream.]

And in the process of looking at fabric online I fell down a rabbit hole and somehow managed with these two beauties showing up in my mailbox last week:

[Photo of two fabrics, one printed like a blue sky with puffy clouds, the other a blue background with black octopi]

Yes, I am going to attempt my first non-costume sewing. Like, real skirts with zippers that I might wear to work. Updates to come…

OOO, SHINY
This month I discovered that these exist:

[Photo of a vase of orange tulips, with a package of Cadbury Creme Egg cookies in the foreground.]

(The cookies, that is. I was already aware of the existence of tulips). And they are DELICIOUS (well, if you like Cadbury Creme Eggs to begin with, which apparently not everyone does for some inexplicable reason). It is possible there may be several more boxes of them in my freezer now, since they are limited edition. (Very limited, based on my current rate of consumption…)

Also, I am inordinately delighted that someone out there came up with this (link goes to a tumblr image that you may also find amusing if you, like me, enjoy both Waterhouse’s painting Lady of Shalott and puns).

January Diversions

04
February
2016

What I’ve been up to in the last month:

READING
Ruin and Rising by Leigh Bardugo [YA Fantasy]
This is the final book in the Grisha trilogy, set in a fantasy land inspired by Russia. I actually read the second book in this series in December but missed it in my summary last month. I read them almost back-to-back because book two ends in a very unsettled place and I was eager to know how it would all turn out. Overall I really enjoyed both! I was particularly impressed by how the plot twists actually surprised me, and yet felt utterly believable. Ultimately I really just loved the world and the way everything came together so compellingly and perfectly in the end — so often a trilogy falls apart in the end, but this one only got stronger and stronger!

How I found it: I had read the first book in this series a while ago, then got distracted by other books and never kept going. But I’ve been hearing such good things about the author’s new series that I decided to go back and finish the earlier one (they take place in the same world). Also, the new book, SIX OF CROWS, had a loooooooong wait list at the library whereas the second and third books in this first series were available right away as ebooks. Also, I love these covers. A superficial motivation, but there it is!

Ms. Marvel, Vol. 4: Last Days by G. Willow Wilson [YA Comics]
This series just keeps digging deeper and getting more rich and rewarding. I love Kamala!

How I found it: Ongoing series…

Bitch Planet, Vol 1: Extraordinary Machine by Kelly Sue DeConnick [Adult Comics]
The bound edition of the first several issues of an adult science fiction comic about a harsh and terrifying future Earth ruled by a literal patriarchy, where women can be convicted and sent to an off-world prison for being too loud, fat, queer, angry, feminist, or otherwise “non-compliant.” It made me both rage, and also punch the air in triumph. I loved the characters, especially Penny Rolle and Kamau Kogo. I can’t wait to see what happens next.

How I found it: I think the first place I heard about this was on The Mary Sue blog, in an article about people getting “non compliant” tattoos inspired by the comic. Once I heard the premise, I knew I had to check it out.

Flying Too High by Kerry Greenwood [Adult Mystery]

and

Murder on the Ballarat Train by Kerry Greenwood [Adult Mystery]

Reading a Miss Fisher book is like sitting down in a beautiful palm-fringed parlour with a cup of tea and a cake and lounging around chatting with a delightful friend. They are quite short, and I am sure if I let myself I would inhale them all in one go, but I am trying to space them out, for when I really need a comforting, dependable sort of book. I will say, though, that there are a few problematic elements related to exoticism and a few other narrative choices I found questionable — I can’t ignore them, and I am hoping that maybe future books will not go in that direction.

How I found it: Ongoing series…

A Desperate Fortune by Susanna Kearsley [Adult Historical]
I enjoyed this, though I think perhaps I wasn’t in quite the right mood for it and so it seemed to take me a long time to get through. I appreciate Kearsley’s ability to weave together a modern and a historical storyline, and engage me in both.

How I found it: I’ve read most of Kearsley’s other books and enjoyed them (especially with the lovely Sourcebooks covers).

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates [Nonfiction]
Illuminating and distressing, written as a set of letters to Coates’ son, in large part about the experience of being black in America (and oversees, too). Every time I think I am starting to understand my own privilege, I read something like this and realize just how much I don’t understand. The stories about the murder of Coates’ college friend (by cops) was particularly wrenching. This was a dense read that took some attention and effort, but I am glad to have read it.

How I found it: I’ve read numerous articles by Coates and appreciated his insights, so when I started hearing all the positive buzz about this book I wanted to make a point to read it.

WRITING
I finished my first revision pass on my new book!

(Image of manuscript in progress, blurred to protect you all from first-draft prose and lots of all-caps notes to myself. Also, that’s my silly little map that I finally drew after I figured out the geography I needed for the story to make sense…)

CRAFTING
My excellent aunt sent me more yarn, similar to the stuff I used to make my last hat. I am already making a second hat for my mom, and now apparently I can make SIX MORE. Knitting has been a nice form of meditation for me lately so this is a good thing. As long as I can find people to give all these hats to.

GAMING
In my quest to play all the BioWare games ever, I started in on Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic, playing a Scout named Vala Jast (I think I spent like a half hour in the name generator). It’s definitely a little clunky compared to Mass Effect and Dragon Age, but I’m enjoying it! Meeting Twi’leks and Wookies and thwarting Sith and gaining Light Side points. Except that then I hit the part where I have to shoot enemy fighters and sadly I am no Finn. So right now I am stuck dying over and over again, because of my bad aim and/or inability to manipulate my mouse. Hopefully I can figure it out (or find a friend who can come get through this fight for me) so that Vala can achieve her Jedi potential!

December Diversions

03
January
2016

What I’ve been up to in the last month:

READING
I didn’t plan it this way, but all my reading this month was comfort reading. All are excellent books that stand on their own, but they are also exactly the kinds of books that are the literary equivalent of a cozy afternoon sitting by the fireside drinking tea and eating toast with a good friend. At least, for me! Lots of warm, complicated friendships and families, delicious food descriptions, a dash of adventure and intrigue, humor, and richly detailed worlds.

Tiled book cover images for December Reading

Cocaine Blues by Kerry Greenwood
I loved this! It was rather short, but fortunately there are over a dozen more in the series. There are some substantial differences from the television series but so far the books have been packed with just as many rich female friendships, gorgeous fashion, clever dialog and witty observations.

How I found it: I was already a fan of the television series so I had been wanting to check out the books that inspired it! I had actually tried reading the first few pages once before and had bounced off them for some reason, but this time everything clicked!

Betsy Was a Junior by Maud Hart Lovelace
I’m slowly going through a re-read of one of my favorite series of all time, the Betsy-Tacy books. I do love this particular book, though it’s got a scene that is one of the hardest for me to read in the entire series (Margaret’s party). I just adore these characters so much, even when they are making mistakes.

How I found it: This is a long-standing favorite series that I have already re-read several times.

Caddy’s World by Hilary McKay
I continue to be in awe of McKay’s ability to create compelling characters and to make them seem so immediately REAL. And to make me love the Casson family so much, flawed as they are.

How I found it: The same friend who first recommended this series posted about this “prequel”, so of course I had to run out and request it from the library, since I’ve loved all the others in the series.

First Class Murder by Robin Stevens
Another delightful mystery set in the 1930s, this time riffing off Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express. Hazel is such a wonderful narrator, and I loved getting to finally meet her father Mr Wong, and to see how her confidence and sense of self continues to grow as the series progresses.

How I found it: I’d read the first two in the series and enjoyed them so much I have been ordering the UK editions so I can (A) get them months earlier and (B) get paperback copies with the delightful UK cover art.

P.S. I Still Love You by Jenny Han
I didn’t originally think that I needed a sequel to To All the Boys I Loved Before. I was wrong. Lara Jean continues to be a distinctive and adorable and refreshing character I just love spending time with.

How I found it: I read and loved the first in this series, and it was available via my library’s ebook lending program.

CRAFTING
I finished my new hat! The colors and the slouchiness make me happy every time I wear it!

Deva wearing a colorful knitted hat

WATCHING

STAR WARS STAR WARS STAR WARS!

COOKING
About 85% of my photos from December have something to do with food. And there was a lot of homemade deliciousness going on.

Starting with these amazing cranberry-orange morning rolls:
cranberry-orange rolls

Continuing with a cookie-baking marathon of which these are only a tiny portion:
Two full baking sheets of gingerbread cookies

To our traditional Christmas dinner of homemade Indian food, including my favorite, the samosas. This is Bob and I doing the less-exciting work of rolling out the dough and stuffing them. I am only smiling like that because I am anticipating eating them!
Deva and Bob making the samosas

And finally, my best friend Maureen and I were inspired by the Great British Baking Show and decided to tackle the challenge of the Prinsesstarta, not being at all put off by the fact that it requires an entire dozen eggs, two pints of cream, almost a pound of ground almonds, and more than a pound of sugar. Unlike the contestants on the show who had less than three hours, we gave ourselves an entire day to work on it (and boy did we need it).

From Princesstarta

(Click to go to a whole set of photos documenting our endeavor)

WRITING
I finished the first draft of a new book (YA Fantasy) just before the end of the year! It’s messy and I figured out a big chunk of it about half-way through and I already have a list of at least a dozen things to revise and it’s probably too short and the ending needs to change but it is DONE. And I am taking a break now to read and mull and play a bunch of Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic.

The owls tracking my progress, including the traditional end-of-draft flurry:

Calender page from December with lots of owl stickers

November Diversions

06
December
2015

What I’ve been up to in the last month:

READING
Serpentine by Cindy Pon [YA Fantasy]
Lushly detailed, immersive, and romantic! I especially loved the main character’s struggles with identity and agency, and the complicated and rich female friendship. There’s a bit of a cliff-hanger in the end, so I am eager for book 2!

How I found it: I’ve known Cindy since we both had our first novels debut the same year (back in 2009). She’s amazing and super hard-working and multi-talented, and I loved her first duology, full of epic action, fierce ladies, delicious foods, and cute boys.

The Young Elites by Marie Lu [YA Fantasy]
I am a sucker for super-hero stories, and this one has the added benefit of being set in a fantasy version of Venice!

How I found it: I was a fan of Lu’s first trilogy, starting with LEGEND, and loved the notion of a story about a girl “villain” inspired by Darth Vader.

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han [YA Contemp]
I loved this — it had a bit of the feel of some of my favorite comfort reads, with the strongly rendered and complicated family at the center of the story. I loved all the little details of Lara Jean’s life, her relationships with her older and younger sisters.

How I found it: I’d been peripherally aware of it for a while, as it’s popped up on various blogs and such that I follow, and the premise was compelling (girl writes secret love letters to every boy she falls in love with, and then one day they all get accidentally mailed). I made the leap to actually reading it when I saw my library had an e-copy available.

Jem and the Holograms: Showtime by Kelly Thompson and Sophie Campbell [YA Graphic Novel]
This was indeed truly, truly outrageous, in a good way. I grew up watching the original Jem cartoon and I love how this new comic interpretation takes the best elements of the source material– the female friendships, the secret identity hijinx, the rival girl bands, the awesomely colorful clothing– and reinterprets it, with an added helping of diversity.

How I found it: I think I first heard about the new comic via The Mary Sue.

WATCHING

How To Get Away With Murder
It only took one episode of this to completely hook both my husband and me. I’m still not entirely sure if I actually *like* any of the characters, but they are certainly engaging and compelling! I was slightly dissatisfied by the resolution of the overarching mystery, but I am still eager to continue with season 2.

The Crimson Field
One of my favorite of the recent batch of British period dramas, depicting the lives of nurses serving at a hospital camp in France during WWI. I’m very sad it wasn’t renewed! There was so much great material to work with, and fantastic acting. At least the final episode left things in a reasonable spot, and I can invent my own endings for the various characters.

Dark Matter
I loved this! And am very glad to hear that it was renewed. It combines a fantastic premise (six people wake from stasis on a starship with no memories and have to figure out who they are, what they were doing, and how they will define themselves now) with a fairly diverse cast and fun, scifi action. I think I was especially partial to it as it reminded me so strongly of Mass Effect, aesthetically.

CRAFTING
Late fall seemed like the perfect time to break out some colorful, glittery yarn and start a new hat:

WRITING
I’m drafting away on a new project. Unfortunately, I hit a block in the middle of the month, just after hitting 45K, and sunk into a small pit of despair. Fortunately, I started keeping a writing journal last year, and in the midst of my misery I thought to look back and see how I was doing while working on the first draft of my last book. I discovered I hit a terrible block on that one too… just after hitting 45K. It didn’t necessarily help me figure out the block (that took a lot of banging of head against outline and some backtracking) but it did make me less angstful. So much about writing is just learning to recognize your own creative patterns and processes!

BLOOMING
Both my African Violets are blooming, and (for the first time in at least 15 years!) so is my Purple Passion Plant (the fuzzy orange blobs in the background of the below photo). I’d like to think the PPP blooms are a good omen, but they kind of smell like something rotting, so maybe I should actually be worried? :-)