Posts Tagged ‘knitting’

November Diversions

06
December
2015

What I’ve been up to in the last month:

READING
Serpentine by Cindy Pon [YA Fantasy]
Lushly detailed, immersive, and romantic! I especially loved the main character’s struggles with identity and agency, and the complicated and rich female friendship. There’s a bit of a cliff-hanger in the end, so I am eager for book 2!

How I found it: I’ve known Cindy since we both had our first novels debut the same year (back in 2009). She’s amazing and super hard-working and multi-talented, and I loved her first duology, full of epic action, fierce ladies, delicious foods, and cute boys.

The Young Elites by Marie Lu [YA Fantasy]
I am a sucker for super-hero stories, and this one has the added benefit of being set in a fantasy version of Venice!

How I found it: I was a fan of Lu’s first trilogy, starting with LEGEND, and loved the notion of a story about a girl “villain” inspired by Darth Vader.

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han [YA Contemp]
I loved this — it had a bit of the feel of some of my favorite comfort reads, with the strongly rendered and complicated family at the center of the story. I loved all the little details of Lara Jean’s life, her relationships with her older and younger sisters.

How I found it: I’d been peripherally aware of it for a while, as it’s popped up on various blogs and such that I follow, and the premise was compelling (girl writes secret love letters to every boy she falls in love with, and then one day they all get accidentally mailed). I made the leap to actually reading it when I saw my library had an e-copy available.

Jem and the Holograms: Showtime by Kelly Thompson and Sophie Campbell [YA Graphic Novel]
This was indeed truly, truly outrageous, in a good way. I grew up watching the original Jem cartoon and I love how this new comic interpretation takes the best elements of the source material– the female friendships, the secret identity hijinx, the rival girl bands, the awesomely colorful clothing– and reinterprets it, with an added helping of diversity.

How I found it: I think I first heard about the new comic via The Mary Sue.

WATCHING

How To Get Away With Murder
It only took one episode of this to completely hook both my husband and me. I’m still not entirely sure if I actually *like* any of the characters, but they are certainly engaging and compelling! I was slightly dissatisfied by the resolution of the overarching mystery, but I am still eager to continue with season 2.

The Crimson Field
One of my favorite of the recent batch of British period dramas, depicting the lives of nurses serving at a hospital camp in France during WWI. I’m very sad it wasn’t renewed! There was so much great material to work with, and fantastic acting. At least the final episode left things in a reasonable spot, and I can invent my own endings for the various characters.

Dark Matter
I loved this! And am very glad to hear that it was renewed. It combines a fantastic premise (six people wake from stasis on a starship with no memories and have to figure out who they are, what they were doing, and how they will define themselves now) with a fairly diverse cast and fun, scifi action. I think I was especially partial to it as it reminded me so strongly of Mass Effect, aesthetically.

CRAFTING
Late fall seemed like the perfect time to break out some colorful, glittery yarn and start a new hat:

WRITING
I’m drafting away on a new project. Unfortunately, I hit a block in the middle of the month, just after hitting 45K, and sunk into a small pit of despair. Fortunately, I started keeping a writing journal last year, and in the midst of my misery I thought to look back and see how I was doing while working on the first draft of my last book. I discovered I hit a terrible block on that one too… just after hitting 45K. It didn’t necessarily help me figure out the block (that took a lot of banging of head against outline and some backtracking) but it did make me less angstful. So much about writing is just learning to recognize your own creative patterns and processes!

BLOOMING
Both my African Violets are blooming, and (for the first time in at least 15 years!) so is my Purple Passion Plant (the fuzzy orange blobs in the background of the below photo). I’d like to think the PPP blooms are a good omen, but they kind of smell like something rotting, so maybe I should actually be worried? :-)

September Diversions

10
October
2015

September was kind of an anxious month, due to ongoing home renovations (exciting but disruptive!), being on submission with a new project (exciting but nerve-wracking!) and a frustrating ongoing injury (pain is no fun). So I definitely needed diversions!

READING
Heaven to Betsy and Betsy in Spite of Herself by Maud Hart Lovelace [YA Historical]
I’ve been slowly re-reading this beloved series, and was in particular need of some comfort reading this month, so I sought these out. If you are a fan of the Little House books or the All-of-a-Kind family books and have not tried Betsy-Tacy, you really should!

How I found them: These are old favorites!

Uprooted by Naomi Novik [Adult Fantasy]
Wonderful! As others have said, this one felt very much in the class of so many of my early favorites (THE HERO AND THE CROWN, HOWL’S MOVING CASTLE, THE DARKANGEL). Beautifully written and compelling, with wonderful characters and a fascinating world. I believe it’s published as adult fantasy but there’s certainly plenty hear to appeal to a YA reader (as long as it’s a YA reader who is okay with some fairly brutal violence and some extra steamy romantic bits).

How I found it: I was already a big fan of Novik’s Temeraire series, so getting UPROOTED was a certainty! Especially after glowing reviews started popping up everywhere…

You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) by Felicia Day [Adult Memoir]
I am pretty much always up for reading about how smart, creative people manage their lives and deal with the pressures of commodifying art.

How I found it: I was already a fan of Felicia Day based on her internet presence, so when I heard she was putting out a memoir I was intrigued. But it was a friend’s rave review on Goodreads that really made me seek it out and actually give it a try.

Yes, Please! by Amy Poehler [Adult Memoir]
This was excellent as an audiobook, read by the author. My favorite bits were the ones about being in a competitive creative career, especially the “Your Career is a Bad Boyfriend” chapter and the bits about awards. A quote from that chapter: You have to care about your work but not about the result. You have to care about how good you are and how good you feel, but not about how good people think you are or how good people think you look… Treat your career like a bad boyfriend. It likes it when you don’t depend on it. It will chase you if you act like other things (passion, friendship, family, longevity) are more important to you.

How I found it: A Facebook friend recommended this as an audio-book (in particular, she mentioned the chapter “Your Career is a Bad Boyfriend” and included the quote above, which I love.)

WRITING
To be honest, I didn’t get a lot of writing done in September. I’m noting that here to remind my future self (and anyone else out there feeling guilty about taking a writing break) that sometimes you just need to take time off, whether it’s because of other obligations or limitations, or just the need to refuel creatively. For me, this month was both of those things. And I think it was the right decision, because so far October has been much more productive and I am enjoying the work again!

GAMING
I finished playing Dragon Age 2! Sadly, it was not my favorite BioWare game, though it sure was fun to watch my rogue Hawke jump around stabbing things, and I really loved the visuals of Kirkwall. But plotwise, I felt as if my choices were not nearly as meaningful as in ME or DA:O. But I’m still eager to give Inquisition a go, as soon as we can upgrade to a PS4! :-) In the meantime, I’m looking for something new to play (on PS3). Any recommendations? I especially love games with beautiful graphics and interesting character interactions that give me feeeeeeelings.

KNITTING
I finished my latest project! This was my first time doing cables, woo!

Here it is:
Gray-green scarf

You can wear it in various different ways: as a scarf, as a cowl, or as I am here, as sort of a shrug:
Deva wearing the gray-green scarf around her shoulders.

Now maybe I am brave enough to try socks…

January Updates

05
February
2014

A miscellany of things that have gotten me through this often-cold, often-gray month:

Steampunk Fractals. Go look here!

Making patterns. I would love to see a live performance by this artist!

Knitting! I finally managed to dig out the hat I am working on and figure out how to read a chart (or at least this not-especially-complex chart). I haven’t gotten to my first cable stitch, but I am on the way!

January was a really excellent reading month for me — I managed to finish 11 books in a variety of genres and levels (1 picture book, 1 adult non-fiction, 2 graphic novels, 6 YA and 1 MG). I’d love to keep it up all year!

Two of my favorites this month both have “Summer” in the title, a fact I had not realized until I started typing up this blog post. Apparently my brain is eager for winter to be over! But they are also really good books, so I wanted to mention them here…

One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia
Of everything I read in January, this is the one that has been staying with me most strongly. This MG historical juggles so many different elements: life in the 1960s, the civil rights movement, the Black Panthers, family dynamics, sisterhood, art, poetry. But I think the reason I loved it most was the protag, Delphine. She’s just plain awesome, from her fierce dedication to taking care of her two younger sisters (even when they don’t want to be taken care of) to her sense of humor and wry observations, to her deep wounds and need to be an 11 year old girl. The only reason I’m not reading the sequel right now is that I’m saving it as a reward for my next writing milestone!

The Last Summer of the Death Warriors by Francisco X. Stork
I loved Stork’s earlier Marcelo in the Real World, but I think I might actually have liked this one even more. Pancho doesn’t necessarily invite the reader to love him, and yet I did, no matter how prickly he was. And I appreciated the absence of false sentimentality, especially involving D.Q., the boy dying of cancer who could easily have been played purely as a sort of Manic Pixie Dream Boy but was much more real.

January was also a good writing month, as evidenced by my latest stickers:

One sticker = 500 words. I’m on the downward slope with this draft, and hoping my momentum will propel me to a finish in February.

I hope January was kind to all of you, too!

How knitting is like writing

01
May
2013

I started learning to knit just about a year ago. I spent most of last year working on a scarf. A looooong scarf. That involved the same series of stitches, over and over again. So when I finally finished that I wanted to work on something “more interesting.”

Have you noticed how “more interesting” so often translates to “Aaaa! How did I ever think I could possibly be capable of THIS???”

But I wanted to learn something new. Like using double pointed needles. Like doing increases and decreases. I wanted to understand arcane invocations like “ssk” and “k2tog” and “pick up one stitch to close the gap.”

It is possible I was slightly over-ambitious. But I fumbled through it, with a lot of help from YouTube and Ravelry. I got almost to the end — I could see the lovely pattern emmerging, I could actually put the thing on my hand and see where the hole for my thumb was and everything. Unfortunately, I could also see all the mistakes. The places where I had created ladders. The uneven sizing. The fact that the glove was just TOO BIG.

I stared at that glove for a long time. I thought about how I was so close to finishing. I asked myself if I could live with those imperfections, knowing I could do better now that I had learned more.

I taught myself another new bit of knitting terminology:

FROGGING: When you undo a bunch of work (or an entire piece). Because you “rip it” and move on.

I started over. I adjusted the pattern to fit my smaller hand. I used what I had learned from the last time. And finally, I ended up with this:

From Misc

Now I just need to knit the other one. Hopefully before fall!

Over the past few years I’ve been working on another project. A book. I have frogged it (in part or in full) a frightening number of times. Yesterday I finished my most recent revision, which involved a pretty significant rewrite of the first few chapters. Yet again.

But I don’t regret it. Each time I learn something. Each time I get closer to the perfect ur-book in my mind.

And hopefully each time I move on to something more interesting!

(Like maybe this?)